Katharine Fortin

Katharine Fortin is an Associate Professor at Utrecht University where she teaches IHL and IHRL. Before joining Utrecht University, she worked at the ICTY, ICC and Norton Rose Fulbright. She is the author of The Accountability of Armed Groups under Human Rights Law (Oxford University Press, 2017) which won the 2018 Lieber Prize. She has written widely about the framework of law that applies to armed groups in non-international armed conflicts and is one of the editors of the Armed Groups and International Law blog.

Book Discussion 18th January 2024: Armed Groups and International Law: In the Shadowland of Legality and Illegality

On Thursday 18th January, there will be a book panel discussion at Utrecht University on the new edited volume that Ezequiel Heffes and I edited: – ‘Armed Groups and International Law: In the Shadowland of Legality and Illegality’ (Edward Elgar 2023). Through a careful consideration of the status of armed groups within a complex legal …

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Petite Sardine or Big Fish? Rebel Governance and the ICC Al Hassan Trial

On 25 May, the Defence finished their closing statements in the Al Hassan case at the International Criminal Court (ICC). The case relates to acts committed during the nine months of 2012 and 2013 that Ansar Dine and Al-Qaida in the Islamic Maghreb (AD/AQMI) controlled Timbuktu. The case stems from a self-referral by Mali in July 2012 …

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State Responsibility and Rebels – an interview with Kathryn Greenman

In this interview, Katharine Fortin talks to Kathryn Greenman about her new book ‘State Responsibility for Rebels: The History and Legacy of Protecting Investment Against Revolution’ (2021, CUP). The interview will be of interest to scholars working on State responsibility (particularly 9 and 10 of the ARSIWA), investment law, (critical) history of international law and …

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Teaching legal blogging and a student blog symposium on AGIL

Between 14th March – 1st April, I taught a short four-session (1 hr 45 mins each) course entitled Armed Groups and International Law in which the assessment type was legal blogging. The course fitted into our capita selecta period of teaching on the public international law LLM at Utrecht. During this period, students are able …

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New report on the Judiciary System of the Autonomous Administration

Last week, Omran Center for Strategic Studies published the English translation of a detailed report on the judicial system of the Autonomous Administration in North and East Syria (originally published in Arabic in August 2021). Below, you can find the Omran Center’s description of the report and the full version can be found here. As …

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“Negotiating Survival” Book Symposium –Dancing with whoever is there: civilian agency, neutrality and the principle of distinction

Ashley Jackson’s fascinating book ‘Negotiating Survival: Civilian –  Insurgent Relations in Afghanistan’ (Hurst 2021) forms part of an important contemporary effort in political and social science literature to turn away from privileging the study of combatant behaviour in war, looking instead more closely at civilian perspectives and responses. The book focuses on the relationship between the Taliban and …

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“Lawmaking Under Pressure” Book Symposium – A retelling of the history of internal conflicts: political fireworks, a post-script to the ‘dreaded article 1’ of API and an agenda for future research

Lawmaking under Pressure is a fascinating chronicle of the drafting history of the treaty provisions that apply to non-international armed conflict. Starting in 1863, the book asks why and how states, commonly concerned with their sovereignty – particularly regarding internal security affairs – have adopted legally binding international rules to constrain their ability to counter …

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