Blog Symposium

Ongwen blog symposium: Culture as evidence and the construction of (un)certainty in the Dominic Ongwen trial

But the bottom line is, look, whom do you believe? (…) So this is really – that’s really a question at the end of the day. (Defence closing statements) Early on in the Ongwen trial the presiding judge Schmitt acknowledged that “things do not occur without any setting, any cultural, political, social setting and it’s …

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Ongwen blog symposium: Two Sides of the Same Coin: The ‘child soldier experience’ at the ICC

On 4 February 2021, Trial Chamber IX (TC IX) of the International Criminal Court (ICC) convicted Dominic Ongwen for 61 of the 70 crimes he was charged with, including crimes against humanity and war crimes. The case has captivated the attention of Court watchers and bloggers in large part because of Ongwen’s traumatic past (see …

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Ongwen blog symposium: Precedent on the Prosecution of Juvenile Offenders for International Crimes

On Feb. 4, 2021, the International Criminal Court (ICC)  convicted Dominic Ongwen of 61 counts of crimes against humanity and war crimes.  Ongwen was a Lord’s Resistance Army (LRA) member whose culpability appears doubtless – he had been accused of numerous atrocities, including brutal acts of sexual violence, and I have seen no commentary questioning …

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Blog Symposium: The International Criminal Court’s conviction of Dominic Ongwen, a former child soldier abducted by the Lord’s Resistance Army

This blog symposium considers several socio-legal aspects arising from the International Criminal Court’s (ICC) judgment on 4 February 2021 in the case of the Prosecutor v Dominic Ongwen. At around nine years old, Mr Ongwen was abducted and used as a child soldier in the Lord’s Resistance Army (LRA), an armed group that has operated …

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Forgotten Freedoms: The Right to Free Expression in Areas Controlled by Non-State Armed Actors

Back to Basics: Non-State Armed Actors and Human Rights Obligations It’s the same old story. Are non-state armed actors bound solely by international humanitarian law (IHL) or by international human rights law (IHRL) as well? The discussion is on-going, unsettled, borderline passé and, still, painfully relevant.   In a gist, while no one denies the applicability …

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Compliance Symposium: Pariah or Stakeholders? Enhancing Compliance with Humanitarian Norms by Including Non-State Armed Groups’ Views and Practice

Up at Opinio Juris, you can find the latest post by Annyssa Bellal and Pascal Bongard “Compliance Symposium: Pariah or Stakeholders? Enhancing Compliance with Humanitarian Norms by Including Non-State Armed Groups’ Views and Practice” in our co-hosted symposium on Compliance in Armed Conflict. Check it out here!

Religious leaders as brokers of humanitarian norm-compliance: Insights from the cases of Colombia, Libya, Mali and Myanmar

The authors of this article are researchers on the project Generating Respect for Humanitarian Norms: The Influence of Religious Leaders on Parties to Armed Conflict. We gratefully acknowledge the support of the Economic and Social Research Council (UK). The humanitarian sector engages State and non-State parties to armed conflicts in an effort to positively influence …

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