Blog Symposium

Peace Treaty Symposium: A Reaction to Mark Freeman’s Post

I want to start by saying that I have always maintained that international law should be a tool rather than an obstacle to peace negotiations; particularly in a world where there are still more that 74 non-international armed conflicts across 25 countries. But if we look at international law today, this is not exactly the …

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The Peace Treaty Initiative: Facilitating the pathway of negotiation through international law

The Peace Treaty Initiative aims to fill a “critical gap in international law” by “developing an international law of peace negotiation”, as Mark Freeman explains in the introductory post of this symposium. This ‘gap’, i.e., the absence of an overarching international legal regime that governs peacemaking, has attracted significant attention in the last decade or …

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Peace Treaty Symposium

When it comes to conflict prevention and resolution, a critical gap in international law is holding us back as a global community. While there is international law to regulate armed conflict and war, no clear counterpart exists to encourage and support peace negotiations. The Peace Treaty Initiative seeks to fill this gap by developing an …

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Ongwen blog symposium: Culture as evidence and the construction of (un)certainty in the Dominic Ongwen trial

But the bottom line is, look, whom do you believe? (…) So this is really – that’s really a question at the end of the day. (Defence closing statements) Early on in the Ongwen trial the presiding judge Schmitt acknowledged that “things do not occur without any setting, any cultural, political, social setting and it’s …

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Ongwen blog symposium: Two Sides of the Same Coin: The ‘child soldier experience’ at the ICC

On 4 February 2021, Trial Chamber IX (TC IX) of the International Criminal Court (ICC) convicted Dominic Ongwen for 61 of the 70 crimes he was charged with, including crimes against humanity and war crimes. The case has captivated the attention of Court watchers and bloggers in large part because of Ongwen’s traumatic past (see …

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Ongwen blog symposium: Precedent on the Prosecution of Juvenile Offenders for International Crimes

On Feb. 4, 2021, the International Criminal Court (ICC)  convicted Dominic Ongwen of 61 counts of crimes against humanity and war crimes.  Ongwen was a Lord’s Resistance Army (LRA) member whose culpability appears doubtless – he had been accused of numerous atrocities, including brutal acts of sexual violence, and I have seen no commentary questioning …

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Blog Symposium: The International Criminal Court’s conviction of Dominic Ongwen, a former child soldier abducted by the Lord’s Resistance Army

This blog symposium considers several socio-legal aspects arising from the International Criminal Court’s (ICC) judgment on 4 February 2021 in the case of the Prosecutor v Dominic Ongwen. At around nine years old, Mr Ongwen was abducted and used as a child soldier in the Lord’s Resistance Army (LRA), an armed group that has operated …

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Forgotten Freedoms: The Right to Free Expression in Areas Controlled by Non-State Armed Actors

Back to Basics: Non-State Armed Actors and Human Rights Obligations It’s the same old story. Are non-state armed actors bound solely by international humanitarian law (IHL) or by international human rights law (IHRL) as well? The discussion is on-going, unsettled, borderline passé and, still, painfully relevant.   In a gist, while no one denies the applicability …

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